programming

[article]

Paying Off the Technical Debt in Your Agile Projects

Summary:
Just as you should not take out a financial loan without having a plan to pay it back, you should also have a plan when incurring technical debt. The most important thing is to have transparency—adequate tracking and visibility of the debt. Armed with the knowledge of these pending tasks, the team can devise a strategy for when and how to “pay off” technical debt.

Just as you should not take out a financial loan without having a plan to pay it back, you should also have a plan when incurring technical debt. The most important thing is to have transparency—adequate tracking and visibility of the debt. Armed with the knowledge of these pending tasks, the team can devise a strategy for when and how to “pay off” technical debt.

About the author

[article]

Code Health Kaizen: Self-Organizing for Agile Improvement

Summary:
People at Ben Kopel's organization were interested in improving their code health. It was something the engineers had control over and leadership didn't need to be involved, so code health was a great candidate for a self-organized initiative. Ben details the meeting they held, their discussions and plans, and how an agile team empowered themselves to improve.

People at Ben Kopel's organization were interested in improving their code health. It was something the engineers had control over and leadership didn't need to be involved, so code health was a great candidate for a self-organized initiative. Ben details the meeting they held, their discussions and plans, and how an agile team empowered themselves to improve.

About the author

[interview]

Why Testers Are Starting to Look More like Developers: An Interview with Mike Faulise

Summary:
In this interview, Mike Faulise, the founder and managing partner at tap|QA, explains how organizations are trying to move toward continuous integration and taking in automation. Consequently, he says, testers are cultivating more technical skill sets and starting to look more like developers.

In this interview, Mike Faulise, the founder and managing partner at tap|QA, explains how organizations are trying to move toward continuous integration and taking in automation. Consequently, he says, testers are cultivating more technical skill sets and starting to look more like developers.

About the author

[interview]

Swim Along with the Testing Wave: An Interview with Dawn Haynes

Summary:
In this interview, Dawn Haynes, CEO, testing coach, and consultant for PerfTestPlus, explains how testers can expand their skills to move along with the development wave and collaborate with their programmer colleagues. She also talks about her problem-solving workshop at the Women Who Test summit.

In this interview, Dawn Haynes, CEO, testing coach, and consultant for PerfTestPlus, explains how testers can expand their skills to move along with the development wave and collaborate with their programmer colleagues. She also talks about her problem-solving workshop at the Women Who Test summit.

About the author

Do You Really Want to Be a Manager?

The majority of managers are promoted due to their software development expertise. But becoming a successful manager requires a drastic change of focus. There is a set of expectations to consider before making that leap to the “dark side.”

Better Software Magazine

References

  1. Mantle, Mickey W. and Ron Lichty. Managing the Unmanageable: Rules, Tools, and Insights for Managing Software People and Teams. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Addison-Wesley Professional, 2012.
  2. Douglas McGregor. The Human Side of Enterprise . 1 st Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1960.
[article]

Tester-Driven Unit Testing: Taking an Active Role

Summary:
Developers have so much to do that unit tests often fall by the wayside. One solution is to train testers to handle them. Testers get involved earlier in the development lifecycle, they can enhance their programming skills, and bugs are found and fixed quickly and easily, reducing the functional testing phase. Consider taking an active role in unit testing.

Developers have so much to do that unit tests often fall by the wayside. One solution is to train testers to handle them. Testers get involved earlier in the development lifecycle, they can enhance their programming skills, and bugs are found and fixed quickly and easily, reducing the functional testing phase. Consider taking an active role in unit testing.

About the author

[interview]

A Comprehensive Full Stack Testing Strategy with Node.js: An Interview with Stacy Kirk

Summary:

In this interview, software agile coach Stacy Kirk explains the reasons for the increasing popularity of Node.js, what full stack testing means, and why Node.js can make it easier. Stacy discusses the best testing practices, processes, and modules to develop Node.js applications.

In this interview, software agile coach Stacy Kirk explains the reasons for the increasing popularity of Node.js, what full stack testing means, and why Node.js can make it easier. Stacy discusses the best testing practices, processes, and modules to develop Node.js applications.

About the author

[interview]

Employ Continuous Integration Processes to Make Your Code Work: An Interview with Melissa Benua

Summary:

In this interview, Melissa Benua, senior backend engineer for PlayFab, explains the new way of life that continuous integration brings. She imparts practical advice for creating builds and running automation on the fly without spending hundreds of hours or thousands of dollars.

In this interview, Melissa Benua, senior backend engineer for PlayFab, explains the new way of life that continuous integration brings. She imparts practical advice for creating builds and running automation on the fly without spending hundreds of hours or thousands of dollars.

About the author

[article]

Try Mob Programming to Inspire Team Growth

Summary:

If you're familiar with pair programming, you know how much it can increase code quality and encourage developers to learn from each other. You should try mob programming—the same concept, but with an entire team of up to eight people and only one keyboard. It's a great way to explore new techniques and solve problems as a team.

If you're familiar with pair programming, you know how much it can increase code quality and encourage developers to learn from each other. You should try mob programming—the same concept, but with an entire team of up to eight people and only one keyboard. It's a great way to explore new techniques and solve problems as a team.

About the author

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