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You Can’t Buy DevOps

There are organizations that want to “buy DevOps,” like it is a plugin to add to the development process. They often create a new role, team, department, or infrastructure. But you can't buy DevOps, and it's not a designated team, either. It is the idea of people working together. Here are some approaches to get you there.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
Getting Employees On Board when Implementing Change Management

Change is a difficult but important part of business. It can be most difficult on the employees, but if you involve them in the planning process and make an effort to understand their points of view, you can mitigate resistance and facilitate the experience for everyone. This article deals specifically with ERP implementation, but its advice is useful for any change management situation.

RK Prasad's picture RK Prasad
DevOps: Changing the Software Testing Game

The DevOps movement promises to be as influential as project management and good requirements ever were in programming and testing. By combining ops (deploys, monitoring) with programming (automated builds, automated virtual servers) and testing (risk management), we get something that is more than the sum of its parts.

Matthew Heusser's picture Matthew Heusser
The Evolution of Configuration Management and a Fond Farewell

After fifteen years as a trusted source of configuration management information and best practices, CMCrossroads is halting its publication of weekly articles. While the current publishing model is changing, the site will remain active and will be updated regularly with relevant articles from our sister sites, StickyMinds and AgileConnection. Bob Aiello, technical editor of CMCrossroads, says thanks to our loyal readers and contributors and lets you know how you can stay connected.

Bob Aiello's picture Bob Aiello
How to Guarantee Failure in Your Agile DevOps Transformation

Many organizations make the same agile and DevOps scaling mistakes year after year, then attempt to rectify them by putting together a great new strategy—only to miss the reasons causing the failure. If you want to refuse to evolve and, as a result, cause your organization’s agile and DevOps transformation efforts to deliver zero business value, be sure to follow these seven antipatterns.

Mik Kersten's picture Mik Kersten
Use Version Control to Unlock Your Development Velocity

Effective source code management provides a basis for every essential development best practice, including continuous integration and continuous delivery. The key is realizing just how much valuable metadata is being created in your source code management system and establishing the tools and procedures to make this information available.

Tamir Gefen's picture Tamir Gefen
Create an Agile DevOps Environment That Fosters Flexibility over Features

When a company makes the move from software as a service (SaaS) to an API-first platform, a change in mindset is required. The successful transitions come from those who shift from features to flexibility. Technology teams should look to remove constraints and broaden the possibilities of their platform by constantly exploring ways to make their platform as flexible as possible.

Steve Davis's picture Steve Davis
Generating Configuration Management Databases Using Data-Driven Synthesis

The traditional configuration management database (CMDB) is big, complex, difficult to grow and change, and very expensive. Compiling data through data-driven synthesis gives IT organizations a better and more cost-effective method of providing the capabilities of a CMDB. This article explains data-driven synthesis, how it is used to generate CMDBs, and its measurable benefits.

Frank Guerino's picture Frank Guerino
Coaching Technology Teams Out of Their Silos to Collaborate in an Emergency

When there is a system outage or other serious problem, most organizations have a critical incident response team to handle communication with all relevant stakeholders. But what happens when communication among the technology experts is not going well? How do you go about understanding the problem and helping each contributor work effectively with the entire response team?

Leslie  Sachs's picture Leslie Sachs
When Postmortems Meet Retrospectives: Improving Your Agile Process

If you want secure, reliable systems, you need all stakeholders actively communicating. This means involving both IT operations and developers in discussions after deployments, to ascertain if anything went wrong and can be avoided, and what went well or could be refined. Integrating your postmortems and retrospectives facilitates collaboration and improves processes.

Bob Aiello's picture Bob Aiello

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