The Latest

Faults of Omission[magazine]

Brian Marick is obsessed with faults of omission in software code, and he thinks you should be too. In this Bug Report, Marick describes coding omissions, design omissions, and requirements omissions, and offers some ways to prevent (or at least test) them.

Brian Marick
A Race with Only Losers[magazine]

Collectively, problems related to resource sharing in multi-threaded, multi-processor, and distributed systems are termed "concurrency problems." Concurrency problems are further divided into several major subcategories such as deadlock, livelock, priority inversion, starvation, and race conditions. This article will focus on race conditions.

Dave Cline
Does a Bug Make a Noise When It Falls in the Forest?[magazine]

You've probably heard the question about noise in the forest: Does a tree falling in the forest make any noise if no one is there to hear it? Noel Nyman examines the question, "Is a bug a bug if no user can ever make it happen?"

Noel Nyman
Learning from Pathfinder's Bumpy Start[magazine]

Steve March discusses problems experienced by the Mars Pathfinder. He imparts the following lessons: 1) design defensively in the face of complexity; 2) design defensively for post-shipment problems; and 3) beware of best cases.

Steve March
How to Avoid Getting Burned by Your CD Release[magazine]

Despite the risks, many companies do not have a formal release process. This article will guide you through some simple steps to verify your software prior to release.

George Hamblen
An Effective Technique for Verifying Software Design[magazine]

While working at a telecommunications company, Linda Hamm had the task of developing and automating tests in a very short time with high-quality expectations. One of the projects was a rule-based expert system for switch maintenance. To help nail down the requirements, the group wrote state diagrams. This article is about what they are and how the group used them.

Linda Hamm
A Look at McCabe IQ: Metrics Analysis and Code Coverage[magazine]

Gedaliah Friedenberg encourages developers and development managers to use the McCabe IQ tool to enhance their development process and deliver better software to QA.

TechWell Contributor's picture TechWell Contributor
Automating Testing[magazine]

Brian Marick gives a simplified history of test automation tools and provides a list of test automation links.

Brian Marick
A Look at e-Test Suite 301 by RSW[magazine]

RSW Software’s e-Test Suite contains four main components. The reusable scripts recorded with RSW e-Tester (the functional testing tool) feed RSW e-Load (the performance and stress-testing tool). For reporting and analysis purposes, results gathered during performance testing feed to RSW e-Reporter. The final tool, RSW e-Monitor, is responsible for monitoring the status of Websites by sending periodic page requests and validating them against previously recorded results.

Christopher Nolan
Techniques for Recruiting and Retaining Testers[magazine]

Are you challenged with having to hire people when your budget is limited, time constraints are tight, and the testing effort is overwhelming? Many of us have faced these situations. In this article, Jack Cook shares some techniques that have proven effective in recruiting and retaining testers.

Jack Cook
The Spirit of the Times[magazine]

Brian Marick points to Web resources and email lists that help keep you current with software and computing trends.

Brian Marick
My Summer as a Hacker[magazine]

Pete TerMaat shares some valuable lessons learned from a summer with "hacking legend" Richard Stallman. He learned that attitude, passion for one's work, was most important. Reviews, coding standards, porting guidelines, bug hunting advice, and other measures can fall flat without a passion for clean code, for "getting things right."

Pete TerMaat
Book Nook: A Book Review[magazine]

Steve Whitchurch reviews the latest edition of Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams, by Tom DeMarco and Tim Lister, describing it as a "must-read for all management wannabes, as well as those who are currently leading project teams and organizations."

Steve Whitchurch
All Valuable Products Are Risky to Build[magazine]

Risks sound like disasters, but risks are neither bad nor good. They are only smart or stupid. Stupid risks are chances taken without significant gain if you succeed. Smart risks are ones that will pay off handsomely if you can overcome them. Smart risks are taken by folks who have knowingly made the decision to proceed in the face of risk.

Tim Lister's picture Tim Lister
Managing the End Game: Avoiding End-of-Project Complications by putting the Test Team in Charge[magazine]

Experiencing end-of-project woes? Read how one test team guided the work at the end of a project by establishing daily goals to meet weekly objectives; by grading the product with a two-tiered approach; and by posting frequent status reports.

Cindy Necaise

Pages

CMCrossroads is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.