Conference Presentations

Metrics Collection and Analysis for Web Sites

To many organizations, the concept of metrics is foreign. Even after taking training on metrics usage, few organizations take advantage of the value metrics can bring. This paper presents the special challenges online companies face, describes a practical plan for rolling out
test metrics, and shows how test metrics collection and analysis can reduce cycle time and provide meaningful information to the development team.

Joe Polvino, Element K
STAREAST 2001: Measuring the Value of Testing

How can we make testing more visible and appreciated? Without measurement, we only have opinions. This presentation outlines simple and practical ways to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of testing, particularly the metric Defect Detection Percentage. Learn how this measure can be implemented in your organization to keep track of defects found in testing (and afterwards). Explore choices, problems, and benefits in using this measure as well as other useful measures.

Dorothy Graham, Grove Consultants
Using Commonly Captured Data to Improve Testing Processes

For a variety of reasons, many test organizations routinely collect data on defects found during testing,
on tests that were run, on estimated time and actual time spent testing, on code coverage, and on
customer-reported problems, among other things. Some of these data only become collectable after
formal processes are put in place, while others can be obtained with minimal effort. The subject of this
paper is to describe a case study of collecting and using the latter type of data. Four databases are used
to track defect data, log test cases, and log customer calls. These data are used to guide efforts at
improving the testing process, the test materials, and the databases themselves. For many testing
organizations, these data are already available. If not, they are easy to collect.

Dean Lapp, Minitab Inc.
Critical Skills and Effective Attitudes for Testers

What distinguishes good testers? Some characteristics explained in this presentation:

  • the right attitudes
  • the appropriate skills
  • continuous skills growth
Rex Black, Rex Black Consulting Services, Inc.
Designing Test Strategies for eBusiness Applications

Identifying the failure points in complex eBusiness systems is becoming increasingly difficult. These systems may integrate business-to-business components, support e-commerce, and facilitate the delivery of electronic content. Learn how to evaluate the hardware, communications, and software architectures to design a successful test strategy to validate functional and structural requirements.

Beverly Kopelic, Amberton Group, Ltd.
Release Criteria: Defining the Rules of the Product Release Game

How do you know when you're finished testing? How do you know when the product is ready to ship? Sometimes the decision to stop testing and release a product seems as if someone's making deals in a smoke-filled room, or that there are rules of the game of which we are unaware. At times, these rules seem completely arbitrary. Instead of arbitrary decisions, it is possible to come to an agreement about when the product is ready to release, and even when it's time to stop testing. In this presentation, learn how to define release criteria, and then use those criteria to decide when to release the product.

Johanna Rothman
Risk: The New Language of eBusiness Testing

Balancing testing against risk in eBusiness and e-commerce applications is essential because we never have the time to test everything. But it's tough to "get it right" with limited resources and the pressures to release software quickly. Paul Gerrard explains how to talk to the eBusiness risk-takers in their language to get the testing budget approved and the right amount of testing planned. Find out how to identify failure modes and translate these into consequences to the sponsors of the project. Using risk factors to plan tests means that testers can concentrate on designing effective tests to find faults and not worry about doing "too little" testing.

Paul Gerrard, Systeme Evolutif Limited
When Test Drives the Development Bus

Once development reaches "code complete," the testing team takes over and drives the project to an acceptable quality level and stability. This is accomplished by weekly build cycles or dress rehearsals. The software is graded based on found, fixed, and outstanding errors. Development strives to increase the grades in each build--improving the quality and stability of the software. Learn how to use this "dress rehearsal" process to build team morale, develop ownership by the entire development team, and ensure success on opening night.

Cindy Necaise, MICROS Systems, Inc.
Managing Test Automation Projects

Automation has three dimensions (organizational, process, and technical), and you should adopt a three-part solution: match skills to tasks; define requirements, environment, and hand-off; and adopt an automation approach and architecture.

Linda Hayes, WorkSoft, Inc.
Outsourced Testing: Should You Consider it?

The need for a reliable test process and knowledgeable testers is more of a necessity than a luxury. Even if a company could afford to buy the latest testing tools and were able to find qualified QA/testing personnel, does it have the money and time to property train its staff on these latest tools? Learn why companies should consider outsourcing their test process-leaving testing to companies that are experts in testing.

Kenneth Paczas, Compuware Corporation

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