Conference Presentations

Java Meets eBusiness: How to Avoid The "Scalability Surprises"

Many corporations are now using Java technologies to deliver mission-critical eBusiness applications for both the intranet and Internet. To better understand how the applications will scale (or perform), this presentation provides you with a systematic process for testing, measuring, and improving performance. Find out what you need to know to property identify and eliminate bottlenecks and ensure optimum performance.

Yves de Montcheuil, Empirix, Inc.
Automated Testing and Monitoring of Large Application Services

Large application services are very dynamic in their functionality, with some of the business rules hosted by these services changing on a daily basis. This presentation discusses one company's experience in developing a new methodology and test infrastructure for automated testing and nonstop QA monitoring of large application services with high requirements churn. Learn how this method allows you to get a handle on quality even though the application services requirements remain a moving target.

Ashish Jain and Siddhartha Dalal, Telcordia Technologies
Communicate and Define the Value of Performance in Dollars and Cents

What is the real value of computing performance improvement? What is the real cost of computing performance degradation? This paper describes an approach used at The Boeing Company to answer these questions. The challenges of presenting technical analyses in "dollars and cents, bottom line" terminology, and sample visual formats for communicating computing performance information
clearly, completely and concisely will be discussed.

Nancy Acree, CAD/CAM Products and Services
Thinking About People, Process, and Product: A Principle that Works at Work

All projects involve the three P's: people, process, and product. People includes everyone who influences the project. Process is the steps taken to produce and maintain software. Product is the final outcome of the project. To keep these three in harmony, you must observe who is trying to do what to deliver what. Usually, two of the three P's are mandated, and the third one is chosen appropriately. Although this is common sense, it is not common practice. Dwayne Phillips discusses the issues and challenges that affect us all on every project. Learn about the ideas and questions to consider to help you work through these issues.

Dwayne Phillips, U.S. Department of Defense
Estimating Software Productivity and Quality on Large Systems

Estimating productivity (e.g., lines of source code developed per hour) and quality (e.g., code defect rates) are difficult on large software projects that involve several companies or sites, emphasize reuse of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components or adaptation of legacy code, and require open architectures. Using actual metrics from such software development projects, this paper illustrates problems encountered and lessons learned when measuring productivity and quality. These include: how to count different types of code; effects of lengthy development times on productivity/quality; variability
between estimates obtained from different models; and tracking and reporting metrics on productivity/quality for projects based on incremental or evolutionary development.

Jack Alanen, California State University

Pages

CMCrossroads is a TechWell community.

Through conferences, training, consulting, and online resources, TechWell helps you develop and deliver great software every day.