Conference Presentations

Adaptive Leadership: Accelerating Enterprise Agility
Slideshow

Agile practices have proven to help software teams develop better software products while shortening delivery cycles to weeks and even days. To respond to the new challenges of cloud computing, mobility, big data, social media, and more, organizations need to extend these agile practices and principles beyond software engineering departments and into the broader organization. Adaptive leadership principles offer managers and development professionals the tools they need to accelerate the move toward agility throughout IT and the enterprise. Jim Highsmith presents the three dimensions of adaptive leadership and offers an integrated approach for helping you spread agile practices across your wider organization. Jim introduces the “riding paradox” and explores the elements of an exploring, engaging, and adaptive leadership style.

Jim Highsmith, ThoughtWorks, Inc.
The Challenges of DevOps in the Enterprise

Many small teams are successful at implementing DevOps practices such as continuous integration. However, enterprises may find implementing DevOps best practices to be much more challenging. This article will help you understand how to be successful implementing DevOps in the enterprise.

Bob Aiello's picture Bob Aiello
Agile Architecture Practices for Large Scale Agile Development

Although “agile architecture” may sound like an oxymoron to you, the reality is that a simple, elegant architecture is a key enabler of any successful system, particularly large scale ones. Scott Ambler describes agile architecture practices-at both the project and enterprise level-that form a middle ground between the extremes of big architecture up-front and outright hacking. Scott discusses agile modeling practices-initial architecture envisioning, proving an architecture with working code, and just-in-time model storming-that enable agile teams to benefit from architectural modeling without suffering the drawbacks of detailed design documentation. Beyond architecture, Scott introduces agile design techniques-continuous integration (CI), test-driven development (TDD), and refactoring-that build on and provide feedback to an emergent architecture.

Theresa Quatrani, IBM Rational
Disciplined Agile Delivery: An Interview with Scott Ambler

Scott Ambler is chief methodologist for IT with IBM Rational. Heather Shanholtzer recently had the opportunity to talk to Scott about scaling agile for enterprise organizations, how agile affects leadership and requirements on large teams, and his Disciplined Agile Delivery framework.

Heather Shanholtzer's picture Heather Shanholtzer
2011 Prediction: Organizations will Continue Applying Agile Strategies at Scale

With all of agile's documented successes, the methodologies are being used in areas never before seen. Scott W. Ambler looks into why agile is as popular as it is, and why its popularity will only increase in the future.

Scott W. Ambler's picture Scott W. Ambler
Enterprise Agile and the Business Analyst

Agile is making its way into the enterprise as a project methodology for industrial-strength projects. Why the popularity? The answer lies in the requirements paradox: “We want requirements to be stable, but requirements are never stable.” Discover some key agile concepts as they affect business analysts.

John C. Goodpasture's picture John C. Goodpasture
The Optimists Don't Make It Out

Optimism is normally viewed as a positive trait, but not when it comes to goals and estimates. Project managers who don their rose-colored glasses when faced with the harsh light of reality are setting themselves up for disappointment.

Lee Copeland's picture Lee Copeland
Agile ALM—Opposites Attract

Agile and ALM are two terms that you don’t often see side by side. To most developers, agile means team interaction, customer collaboration, dynamism, and responsiveness to change. In contrast, ALM seems to imply the opposite of agile, with echoes of rigid procedures, inflexibility, and top-down process control. But are the agile and ALM approaches as contradictory as they first appear to be?

Mike Shepard
Enterprise Change Management in Agile Software Development

Agile software development is designed to thrive within even the most dynamic business and technical environments. All agile methodologies include integrated practices and processes that manage evolving requirements to efficiently develop a continuous stream of new software capabilities. However, what Agile does not address are changes related to enterprise support that falls outside the scope of the project work. Enterprise Change Management (ECM) provides a framework that addresses many of these missing factors.

Performance Testing Throughout the Life Cycle

Even though it is easy to say that you should continuously test your application for performance during development, how do you really do it? What are the processes for testing performance early and often? What kinds of problems will you find at the different stages? Chris Patterson shares the tools and techniques he recently used during the development of a highly concurrent and highly scalable server that is shipping soon. Chris explores how developers and testers used common tools and frameworks to accelerate the start of performance testing during product development. Explore the challenges they faced while testing a version 1 product, including defining appropriate performance and scale goals, simulating concurrent user access patterns, and generating a real world data set. Learn from his team's mistakes and their successes as Chris shares both the good and the bad of the process and results.

Chris Patterson, Microsoft

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